Sparkling Water or Water Lilies? The Comfort vs. Beauty Problem

First things first: posthistorical is back! I am very excited to be blogging again. The world seems much the same: Obama, Harper, and Merkel have won more elections; politicians everywhere squabble over ridiculously trivial things and generally accomplish nothing; we collectively still spend way too much time on facebook. And yet much has changed: this blogger now lives in the Golden State instead of the True North Strong and Free, and with a government-enforced sabbatical now has a lot fewer excuses not to post frequently.

It’s also 4 years (ish) since I started posting on this blog, and that means the exciting quadrennial spectacle of nationalism that got many of my juices flowing last time (otherwise known as the Winter Olympics) will soon be upon us. Once more, in Russian! More to come.

But first!

A dichotomy for the ages

One of the things that started me on blogging again was a rush of ideas I encountered while re-reading Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World for a book club meeting. I will likely tease out a number of themes and their repercussions in the modern world in future posts, but the one that resonated most strongly with me was the dichotomy that one of the book’s main characters presents between truth & beauty and comfort & happiness. To have beauty and truth, he reasons, one needs to endure political and emotional instability, heartbreak, misery and terror – basically, opportunities to show mercy, wisdom and courage in the face of overwhelmingly bad odds. Happy and comfortable people have no need to rise above their situations in such a manner.

But who would choose discomfort and misery, given the choice?

The general trend of world history has been toward comfort, both in a material way and in the sense of social stability. If the nineteenth century was the century of engineering and industry, the twentieth century was the century of comfort. It was the century of spandex, widespread air conditioning and La-Z-Boy. More people than ever before were lifted out of poverty, and industrialization led to middle-class (or relative middle-class) comfort worldwide.

The number of people who choose sneakers over high heels or jeans and t-shirts over Little Lord Fauntleroy suits seems to back up comfort’s victory over beauty. And from the range of falsehoods – from “spin” to blatant lies – evident in government, advertising and many other areas, truth doesn’t seem to do very well either.

Have we already made the choice? And if so, is this progress?

The truth/beauty vs. happiness/comfort dichotomy mirrors the idea of moral vs. technological progress. Some thinkers, such as John Gray, whose anti-humanist work Straw Dogs I’ve written about before, believe that technological progress is in theory limitless, but that our moral progress as humans is essentially stalled. Nuclear technology, to use an example he gave, while a huge technological boon that can supply power to millions, has simultaneously allowed us to wipe cities off the map, a more efficient killing machine than had ever been known before.

Systematic discrimination

Perhaps truth and beauty – or moral progress, if we can equate the two – have seemingly lost out to comfort and happiness – technological progress – because the large-scale systems that largely control our lives have focused mainly on them. Take governments: funding for truth and beauty (whatever that would look like) will almost always come second to funding for hospitals, police, and even infrastructure – that is, the necessary building blocks for a comfortable life. The Brave New World character I mentioned earlier also points out that rule of the people leads to an emphasis on comfort and happiness over truth and beauty – certainly, this is the credo of America, “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,” not, incidentally the pursuit of truth. Comfort, or at least freedom from harm and repression, was the first priority of the revolutionaries.

I went back to examine some other modern revolutionaries. Re-reading The Communist Manifesto, I discovered that the aims of Communism also begin with comfort before proceeding to truth, even if the ideals contained within the movement are based on so-called universal truths. Guaranteeing subsistence was the first step, through a radical change in property rights, the tax system, etc. followed by universal education (i.e., the pursuit of truth and beauty).

The other large system that governs our lives, free market capitalism, is also geared toward profits that can more easily be made from comfort than beauty.  This is why Proctor & Gamble, who sell deodorant and diapers, made $US 81 billion in 2013, and the New York Times, winner of more Pulitzer prizes than any other newspaper, struggles each quarter to make a profit. Perhaps this also explains the existence of the phrase “starving artist.”

First things first

There may be a way to see a positive outcome in this. Perhaps it is not so much a dichotomy between truth/beauty and comfort/happiness, as a ladder, or hierarchy, if you will. Perhaps, like ol’ Maslow said, we focus first on satiating the need for food, clean water and safety before striving for self-actualization.

Now, we all know how much I love Maslow (and so does everyone else, apparently, because this is by far my most read post). But this theory would disagree with Huxley’s characters, who imagine that it is either a comfortable, drugged out existence devoid of anything so confusing and challenging as truth, OR starving artists capitalizing on their misery and discomfort by creating beauty, that is, skipping straight to the top of the hierarchy.

I posit this theory: those who can truly move to the self-actualization stage can only do so because they feel their more basic needs have already been met. This is true even though they live in the same world as those more susceptible to advertising campaigns which introduce needs we never knew we had (for the new iPhone, elective rhinoplasty, or gluten-free dog food, for example). Maybe it’s just that those seeking truth and beauty seem deprived and miserable to those who couldn’t imagine taking their places.

Our need for comfort will stay the same as our definition of comfort changes; perhaps those who can be comfortable enough already, without soma and shiny new things, can have their truth/beauty cake and eat it too – happily.

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2 Responses to Sparkling Water or Water Lilies? The Comfort vs. Beauty Problem

  1. I am intrigued by your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

  2. […] traditions to mark out who we are and how we should behave. To take a small but non-trivial example I wrote about recently: our clothing sends out signals about who we are and what we expect from life. There are no […]

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